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Give them a balata ball. Then let's see what happens. Back in 1980's it was hard just to pay the price of balata. Let's see what happens with the spin and compression of balata.Golf was once a stage for artists, lets make it that again. Bomb and gouge is boring.

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Heck no. The courses weren’t designed for that kind of play. It takes shot making out of the equation. Unfortunately with everyone focused on distance for the last few years you can’t expect anything else.

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These big drives are taking the strategy out of the game. It isn’t as fun to watch and appreciate the course design

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The keys to distance are physical and equipment. The players are working on improving their strength and technique to maximize their swing and ball speed. They need to be allowed to continue in this segment without limitation. Equipment, on the other hand, needs to be evaluated fully with respect to providing unfair advantage to players. The equipment specs need to be closely monitored by the USGA to ensure that they comply with club and ball standards. Therefore, the only areas in which distance can be controlled is equipment and ball. Modifying the ball and driver materials, in my opinion, is the only fair way to limit carrying distances.

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Will never happen. Pro golfers will always use the same basic equipment as recreational players. Theirs is of course tweaked to the nth degree, but if you have the money, you can get exactly what they have. All other sports use the same equipment from HS and beyond with the notable exception being baseball bats which there is an ever-increasing movement to abolish aluminum bats in HS and college. They will never make "pro-use" golf balls and "recreational-use" golf balls. And the minute Johnny Weekender gets a hold of a limited flight ball and can no longer drive the ball 200 yards, there will be a mass exodus from the sport.

The key is the course. They have to stop mowing the first and second cuts just inches high and place the emphasis back on control, not just distance. I have no problem watching a guy drive 340 onto the fairway. But when he is hitting only 50-60% of fairways in regulation but still makes par because they can get out of the rough just as easy....that needs to stop.

Also, they need to start treating tournament set-ups as part of the course. Bogus that a guy can hit the ball to the base of a grandstand and get relief. For that week, the grandstand IS PART OF THE COURSE.

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Strength is not just given. He works hard to get the strength and speed behind the club. Work on muscle mass if you can’t compete. Good for you Bryson.

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The pros, including Bryson, are trying to improve so they can perform as well as possible. We should appreciate that, not take it away from them. Downgrading their equipment to make them more average is not the way to go. Read "Harrison Bergeron" by Kurt Vonnegut. That is not a future I want to see. Make the courses more challenging for the tournament pros so that they can display their full range of abilities for the rest of us to appreciate and try to emulate.

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Most of us senior guys saw this coming wit the advent of the giant headed driver and the better cored balls. When the big three were playing once in a while Jack or Arnie would hit a 30 yd. drive. The golf courses are not made for the new normal. My solution is Jack's make the balls not as lively. Go back to shafts that allow for slices and hooks. I personally need all the distance I can get. When these guys get in there 80's they will wish they could go back in time.

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Comparing what golfers and equipment can do to Tom Brady is hardly a good comparison. I'm not a fan of Bardy - the last I heard no golfer was ever found committing an inflategate - not even once, never mind on several occasions!

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It is a shame to see brute strength combined with custom shafts, custom juiced golf balls, and size golf clubs destroy the unique designs of classic golf courses. Watching players consistently bombing 300 + yard drives and hitting pitching wedge to the green is boring and reduces the game to pitch and putt. Watching the skill of Tiger hitting 4 and 5 irons to 10ft of the pin was fascinating and so impressive 20 years ago. Let's cut back on the custom equipment advantages and get back to skill and precision of the Palmer, Nicholas, Watson days. Do we need to go back to persimmon heads and balata balls, no. But we don't need to equip these guys with space age metals, over size club heads, fine tuned shafts, and rocket balls. Make them play the game and the courses like the rest of us, albeit nowhere as badly.

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I think there comes a time in many sports where a limit has to be applied to technology to make the game more enjoyable to watch. Thats the whole point, isn't it? Just as Pete Sampras made tennis boring with his cannon like serves and changes were made to the rules over equipment, just like Formula One changes the rules for cars, golf needs to reduce the role that power plays in pro golf. The two variables are, as you yourself mentioned, ball and club design. Dimension and sweet spot limits on clubs would be a start, and then limits on compression and dimple configuration to make it harder to hit the really long drives, make slight mishits much much more penal and make it easier to move the ball in the air - like in the days of Nicklaus, Watson and Player. Otherwise we say goodbye to Open Championships at St Andrews, and TPCs at Sawgrass. Where is the joy in that! Let's mix it up!