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Very sad.
I thought the golf world was trying to get more golfers involved in the game and make it more accessible. This is terrible. And I thought tiger cared about the kids and people that don’t have a ton of money. they should make the green fee $50 or less. Seriously.

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It seems tiger is really interested in making the average golfer have an enjoyable experience. This is great for someone like myself, a 20
handicapper at 85 years old.

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I agree with all who feels that the price is taking a lot of average golfers out of even playing there. Seems to be for the rich since a lot of people can’t just drop $200+ to play plus stay there.

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Fabulous review. Has a date been set for the opening of all 19 holes in 2020? The weather may work against them for an opening after Halloween.

Staff
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Interestingly there is a set date for the closing of the preview loop, but no official opening date for the total course.

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It's nice to someone designing a course that is not torture for the average golfer, but $225 to play a round of golf is something I would never consider. There are too many nice courses you can play for way less. A shame that so many resort courses have raised their prices to the point that a golf week is out of the question for many.

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I totally agree. Catering to the wealthy. If trying to bring in the younger crowd, then make it fun including affordable.

Staff
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The day I was there, a fairly large buddies trip of early-30-something guys were at Ozarks National. Honestly the $225 is relatively affordable compared to the top US resort courses. $195 for Ozarks National, in my opinion, is quite good value.

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Last week I played the Crenshaw/Coore Cliffside course at the Omni Barton Springs Resort (think it was included in a recent GA article if not mistaken). Fabulous course, scenery, etc. Was supposed to be $139, I paid $69 because I was there with a member. I have been on Bali Hai in Vegas, another great course that would have to be considered a resort course... for just over $100.

$200+ a round? Pass.

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Sorry, for the majority of rank & file golfers, two+ Benjamins is not "good value" or affordable. Comparing it to the forever, grossly overpriced PBR and its ilk is a nice PR exercise for Comcast/NBC and its coterie but all it does is perpetuate the elitist nature of the game, especially in the US, and further it's decline. To put things in perspective, a pedestrian resort track like this (no offense meant to TW or any other designer) costs almost as much as the Old Course in peak season and is much more expensive in the shoulder and off seasons. Sorry, if I had to make a choice, I'd take my savings over two-three years, fly cattle and go play the Old Course any time. That's "quite good value" IMO.

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This is a thoughtful piece centered on course design by the two greatest all-time golfers, who may or may not fare as well in the historical annals as architects.

Growing up, I was a complete Nicklaus fan—and will always be for many reasons—although I liked many other touring pros from the 70’s/ early 80’s era (including Watson, Trevino, Weiskopf, Miller, Irwin, Ballesteros). And while I like, appreciate, and respect what he’s done as an architect, the body of architectural work hasn’t matched his supreme golfing skills—although it’s hard to critique his landmark courses, designed to test the best, like Muirfield Village.

While I do think the designer Nicklaus has had in mind the average player, to some extent, his foremost design considerations have been for good and excellent and great players. These players largely inform the playability of his creations, at least on the Nicklaus courses I’ve encountered. They are certainly terrific layouts that I’ve enjoyed . But I’ve played with and watched average players toil and struggle on them, in the end often cursing their difficulties.

I’ve never played a Tiger Woods-designed course, but your pictures and descriptions are revealing. I’m glad to hear, from what I’m inferring about his philosophy, that he’s going more in the direction of Doak than Dye or Nicklaus.

Staff
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Good thoughts there, thanks for sharing. I would say Doak's greens have a lot more going on than what I've seen from Tiger so far at Bluejack and Payne's.

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Interesting comment--thanks for making that distinction. From the one Doak course I've played, I came away with the feeling that there was no facet of course design that the man hadn't mastered.