Larry Olmsted

Special Contributor

Larry Olmsted has been a leading golf journalist for over a decade with a focus on golf travel. He wrote Golf Travel by Design and he co-wrote Fairways: America's Best Golf Resorts. He was the founding editor of The Golf Insider, and the golf columnist for both USA Today.com and US Airways Magazine. Olmsted has ranked resorts for Golf Magazine's annual Gold & Silver Medal awards and is a panelist for Rolex World's Top 1000 Golf Courses. He has appeared on television and radio as a golf travel expert and is a contributing editor to Elite Traveler, Cigar Aficionado, and Lexus Magazine. His work has appeared in Golf Magazine, Travel & Leisure Golf, LINKS, Men's Health, Men's Journal, USA Today, Playboy, the New York Daily News, Boston Herald, Boston Globe, Outside Magazine, Golf & Travel, Diversion, New York Magazine, American Way, Sports Afield, Shape, Caribbean Travel & Life, and many, many others. He also joined Nicklaus, Woods and Sorenstam in the record book when he broke the Guinness World Record for "Greatest Distance Traveled Between Two Rounds of Golf Played in Same Day" at 7496-miles, and is the author of the critically acclaimed Getting Into Guinness. He has played and written about golf on every inhabited continent.

Recent articles
Central America has been emerging as new temptation for golf travelers, with resorts combining high-end lodging and high-profile golf architects. Now Nicaragua is getting into the act, and Mukul Resort is a perfect example of destination golf.
There are lots of good casino golf courses in the U.S. and plenty of fun casino resorts, but not that many places with both. Travel and casino expert Larry Olmsted breaks down his five favorites.
The nationwide explosion of casino gambling has fueled an interesting side effect -- a nationwide explosion of casino golf courses, often of better quality and at lower prices than their non-casino peers. In few places is this selection larger, better or more of a bargain than on the Gulf Coast, where famous designers and full-service hotels vie with plush beaches and wonderful regional cuisine for the traveler's attention.
The nationwide explosion of casino gambling has fueled an interesting side effect -- a nationwide explosion of casino golf courses, often of better quality and at lower prices than their non-casino peers. When it comes to casino golf courses, Vegas is still king. But the rest of the Southwest is no slouch, especially Arizona and New Mexico, packed with world-class golf courses -- most of them dramatic desert layouts -- and urban appeal.
The explosion of casino gambling nationwide has fueled an interesting side effect -- casino golf courses. Since the casino boom started in the Northeast, it is no surprise that some of the largest casino/golf facilities are found here. Larry Olmsted writes about some of the best casino/golf options in the Northeast, including Foxwoods and Turning Stone Resort.
With 72 holes and a major casino, Turning Stone Resort is the largest golf resort in New York state. But even though it is located within a relatively easy drive of roughly 30 million people, too few golfers in the New York City metro area know about it. That needs to change, Larry Olmsted writes.
The nationwide explosion of casino gambling has fueled an interesting side effect -- a nationwide explosion of casino golf courses, often of better quality and at lower prices than their non-casino peers. Many examples of this -- including some of the oldest, some of the newest and the only casino course to ever host a major -- are spread throughout the vast expanse that is the Midwest.
Casinos have been on a golf boom for the past 20 years, and the quality is usually well above the national average and often better priced. In California, casino golf is especially prolific. Larry Olmsted offers up some of the best bets in the Golden State.
Is it sacrilegious to call a links course in the birthplace of golf the Bandon Dunes of Scotland? In many ways, that's exactly what Machrihanish Dunes is. Both are on hard-to-get-to sections of coastline that attract golfers to play neoclassic links golf. The big difference is that in pre-Kidd Bandon, Oregon there was nothing, but the pre-Kidd Kintyre Peninsula was already home to fabled Machrihanish Golf Club. That is where the story gets interesting.
If you go to Toronto to play golf, odds are you'll end up at Glen Abbey Golf Club anyway. But if you're on the fence, the on-site Royal Canadian Golf Association Museum pushes it over the edge, Larry Olmsted writes in his Beyond the Course column. It's on par with the museums at Valderrama, St. Andrews and Pinehurst but only costs about as much as one Titleist.
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